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Dive Sites

Wreck DIves

Wreck Dives:

YO-257

YO-257
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History of the YO-257

The YO-257, also known simply as "YO", is a former Navy yard oiler that once played a crucial role in the U.S. Navy’s operations during World War II. Built in the 1940s, the YO-257 was designed to refuel naval vessels at sea, a critical function during wartime. After decades of service, the vessel was decommissioned and eventually purchased by Atlantis Submarines, a company known for its underwater tours and commitment to marine conservation.
In 1989, Atlantis Submarines decided to create an artificial reef and enhance local dive tourism by sinking the YO-257 off the southern coast of Oahu. The sinking was carefully orchestrated to ensure the ship would settle in a location that would foster marine life and provide a safe, accessible site for divers. Today, the YO-257 rests on the ocean floor, serving as a vibrant underwater habitat and a popular dive site near Waikiki.


Scuba Diving the YO-257

  • Location and Access

The YO-257 is located approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 kilometers) off Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, at coordinates 21.2612° N, 157.8374° W, making it a convenient dive site for both locals and visitors. Diving this site is highly dependent on the currents and tides. The short boat ride from Waikiki means divers can spend more time exploring the wreck and less time traveling.

  • Depth and Conditions

The YO-257 lies in about 85 feet (26 meters) of water, making it an ideal site for intermediate to advanced divers. The ship sits upright on a sandy bottom, creating a striking and accessible structure for exploration. While the depth is manageable for those with proper training, the site can experience strong currents. Because of the currents this site is not always available to dive.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

Oahu’s waters are known for their comfortable diving conditions, with temperatures ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C) year-round. Visibility around the YO-257 is typically excellent, often extending to 100 feet (30 meters) or more on clear days. This exceptional visibility allows divers to fully appreciate the intricate details of the wreck and the abundant marine life that now calls it home.

  • Experience Level Required

Due to its depth and occasional strong currents, diving the YO-257 is best suited for those with an advanced open water certification. We offer guided dives that can accommodate divers of varying skill levels. For those looking to improve their diving skills, we offer  PADI Advanced Open Water and Wreck Diver Specialty courses, providing you the training needed to safely explore deeper and more challenging sites like the YO-257.

Exploring the Underwater Realm

Diving the YO-257 is a unique experience that combines historical intrigue with the beauty of a thriving marine ecosystem. Over the years, the wreck has evolved into an artificial reef, attracting a diverse array of marine life. Soft corals, sponges, and algae cover the ship’s surfaces, while schools of tropical fish, such as butterflyfish, angelfish, and parrotfish, weave through its structures. Larger marine species, including green sea turtles, eagle rays, and white-tip reef sharks, are also frequently spotted patrolling the area.
As divers descend to the YO-257, they are greeted by the sight of the ship’s hull rising from the sandy ocean floor, a testament to both its naval history and its new life as a marine sanctuary. The ship’s decks, compartments, and external features offer numerous points of interest, each teeming with marine flora and fauna, providing a glimpse into the harmonious coexistence of man-made structures and natural life.

Conservation and Future Prospects

The YO-257 serves as a powerful example of how artificial reefs can benefit marine environments and local economies. These sites not only draw divers from around the world but also support the health and diversity of marine ecosystems. Ongoing conservation efforts and responsible diving practices are essential to preserving these underwater habitats. By protecting sites like the YO-257, we ensure that they remain vibrant and sustainable for future generations to explore and enjoy.
Atlantis Submarines’ decision to sink the YO-257 has provided Oahu with a remarkable dive site that bridges the gap between history and nature. Whether you are an experienced diver or a newcomer to the sport, visiting the YO-257 offers a unique opportunity to connect with the past and witness the resilience and beauty of the underwater world.

San Pedro

San Pedro

History of the San Pedro

The San Pedro, built in Japan around 1946, is a 111-foot long, Korean-owned long-line fishing vessel that primarily targeted swordfish and tuna off the Big Island. In 1975, while carrying supplies to an offshore fishing fleet, the ship caught fire off South Point and was badly damaged. It was towed to Keehi Lagoon and left derelict for years. In 1996, Atlantis Submarines intentionally sank the San Pedro next to the YO-257 to enhance their underwater tour offerings.

Scuba Diving the San Pedro

  • Location and Access

Located about 1.5 miles off Waikiki Beach, the San Pedro is easily accessible by boat next to the YO-257. 

  • Depth and Conditions

The San Pedro rests in about 80 feet (24 meters) of water, with its deck at around 60 feet (18 meters). The wreck can be fully penetrated and explored with proper training and equipment. Being next to the YO-257 this site as well can experience strong currents and is only dove when conditions are ideal.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

Water temperatures range from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C), with visibility often reaching 100 feet (30 meters), providing clear views of the wreck and marine life.

  • Experience Level Required

Suitable for advanced divers, guided dives are available for all experience levels. PADI Advanced Open Water and Wreck Diver Specialty courses are recommended for those looking to improve their skills.

Exploring the Underwater Realm

The San Pedro, now an artificial reef, attracts diverse marine life. Soft corals, sponges, and algae cover the wreck, with tropical fish, green sea turtles, eagle rays, and reef sharks frequently seen. The wreck is remarkably intact, offering a unique experience for wreck enthusiasts.

Conservation and Future Prospects

The San Pedro exemplifies the benefits of artificial reefs for marine ecosystems and eco-friendly tourism. Ongoing conservation efforts and responsible diving practices are crucial for preserving these sites. The San Pedro, along with the YO-257, offers a unique dive experience that blends history with vibrant marine life.

Sea Tiger

SEA TIGER

History of the Sea Tiger

The Sea Tiger, originally named MV Tharos, was a former Chinese trading vessel that was repurposed into a Taiwanese tuna boat. Built in the 1950s, it embarked on various voyages across the Pacific Ocean, laden with goods and stories of maritime adventure. However, its fate took a dramatic turn on January 7, 1999, when it was seized by the U.S. Coast Guard for illegal smuggling activities off the coast of Hawaii.

The ship's seizure was part of a broader crackdown on illicit trafficking in the region. Its operators, facing apprehension and legal consequences, chose a drastic course—to scuttle the vessel rather than face prosecution. On that fateful day, the Sea Tiger was intentionally sunk off the southern coast of Oahu, near Honolulu, where it found its final resting place on the ocean floor.

Scuba Diving the Sea Tiger

  • Location and Access

Today, the Sea Tiger rests approximately 90 feet (27 meters) below the surface, just a short boat ride from the bustling Waikiki Beach in Honolulu. This proximity makes it easily accessible to both seasoned divers and those new to underwater exploration.

  • Depth and Conditions

Diving the Sea Tiger is a thrilling experience but requires careful planning due to its depth. Descending to the wreck involves navigating depths of around 80 to 100 feet (24 to 30 meters), depending on tides and conditions. The wreck itself sits upright on the sandy ocean floor, offering divers an imposing sight as they approach its hull.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

The waters surrounding Oahu typically boast comfortable temperatures for diving year-round, ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C). Visibility around the Sea Tiger wreck can vary but often extends to 100 feet (30 meters) or more on clear days, providing ample opportunity to explore its features and marine life inhabitants.

  • Experience Level Required

While the Sea Tiger is accessible to advanced open water divers due to its depth, it is also a popular destination for those seeking to expand their diving skills. We offer guided trips to the wreck, accommodating divers with varying levels of experience. For those new to deep dives and wreck diving, give us a call to enroll in our PADI Advance Open Water course or Wreck Diver Specialty course.

Exploring the Underwater Realm

Diving the Sea Tiger is not just about exploring a sunken ship; it's about immersing oneself in a thriving underwater ecosystem. The wreck has become a haven for a diverse array of marine life, transforming its metal structures into vibrant artificial reefs. Soft corals cling to its surfaces, while schools of tropical fish dart through its corridors. Lucky divers may encounter larger inhabitants such as sea turtles, moray eels, and even reef sharks patrolling the outskirts of their newfound habitat.

As divers descend through the crystal-clear waters, they are greeted by the sight of the Sea Tiger's hull rising from the ocean floor, its once utilitarian form now a testament to the resilience of nature and the allure of underwater exploration. Exploring its decks and compartments offers a glimpse into its storied past, with artifacts and remnants scattered amidst the marine flora and fauna.

Conservation and Future Prospects

While the Sea Tiger serves as a captivating dive site, its presence also underscores the importance of responsible marine conservation. Artificial reefs like the Sea Tiger not only attract divers but also support local marine ecosystems, offering shelter and breeding grounds for countless species of fish and invertebrates. Efforts to preserve and protect these sites are crucial to ensuring their longevity and continued appeal to divers and marine enthusiasts alike.

Navy Tug

Navy Tug - Nasua YTB-774

History of the Navy Tug Nasua (YTB-774)

The USS Nashua (YTB-774) is a former US Navy ship, built in 1965 by Marinette Marine. It belonged to the Natick class Large District Harbor Tugs, measuring 106 feet in length with a beam of 29 feet. Primarily used for towing and pushing naval ships at Subic Bay Naval Station, Philippines, it also served in firefighting and harbor patrol roles. After the base closed in 1992, the Nashua was transferred to Pearl Harbor and decommissioned in 1994. The wreck was intentionally sunk in 2012 to serve as an artificial reef and a training site for the Navy's Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One.

 The coordinates for the Navy Tug dive site are approximately 21.4037461° N latitude and -158.2138746° W longitude. This site is situated outside of Pearl Harbor and rests at a depth of about 65 feet (20 meters)​. The site is well-known for its vibrant marine life, including large schools of Blueline snappers, Yellow Tangs, Trumpetfish, Brown surgeonfish, Cushion stars, and Slipper lobsters. It provides a fascinating underwater experience for divers, making it a must-visit site for those exploring Oahu’s underwater attractions.

Scuba Diving the Navy Tug

  • Location and Access

 The coordinates for the Navy Tug dive site are approximately 21.4037461° N latitude and -158.2138746° W longitude. This site is situated outside of Pearl Harbor and rests at a depth of about 65 feet (20 meters)​ making it accessible to divers of various skill levels. Reaching the wreck requires a bit of longer boat ride than other South Shore dive sites from the Honolulu Harbors. Combined with the Ewa Pinnacles, this site is only available on our Private dive charters and a select schedule each month.

  • Depth and Conditions

Diving the Navy Tug offers a unique opportunity to explore a well-preserved wreck in relatively shallow waters. The wreck lies within a depth range of 60 to 80 feet (18 to 24 meters), allowing divers ample time to explore its structure and surroundings. The tug remains largely intact, providing a compelling sight as divers approach its hull and superstructure.

 

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

The waters surrounding Oahu maintain comfortable temperatures for diving throughout the year, typically ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C). Visibility around the Navy Tug wreck can vary depending on currents and weather conditions but often extends to 60 feet (18 meters) or more. This clarity enables divers to appreciate the wreck's details and observe marine life that has made the tug its home.

  • Experience Level Required

Diving the Navy Tug is suitable for divers with advanced open water certification or equivalent experience due to its depth and potential currents. While the wreck itself is accessible, navigating its interior and exterior requires a level of comfort with buoyancy control and awareness of underwater surroundings. 

Marine Life and Conservation Efforts

The Nasua wreck has transformed into a vibrant artificial reef, attracting a rich diversity of marine life. Coral formations, sponges, and sea fans adorn its surfaces, providing habitat and shelter for numerous fish species. Divers may encounter colorful reef fish, octopuses, and occasional larger marine creatures like turtles or reef sharks patrolling the area.

Efforts to preserve and protect the Nasua wreck emphasize responsible diving practices and environmental stewardship. These initiatives ensure that the wreck remains an accessible and sustainable diving destination, while also supporting marine conservation efforts in the region.

Corsair

Corsair

History of the Corsair

The Corsair is a WWII-era aircraft wreck that lies off the coast of Oahu, providing a unique and historically significant dive site. This F4U Corsair fighter plane, built by Vought, was a staple in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps during the war, known for its distinctive gull wings and powerful engine. On February 22, 1946, this particular Corsair was on a routine training flight when engine failure forced the pilot to ditch it into the ocean. The pilot was rescued, but the aircraft sank and has remained on the ocean floor ever since.

Today, the Corsair wreck offers divers a rare opportunity to explore a piece of aviation history submerged in the vibrant waters of Hawaii. The wreck lies in an area that has fostered a rich marine ecosystem, making it a compelling site for both history enthusiasts and marine life observers.

Scuba Diving the Corsair

  • Location and Access

The Corsair wreck is located approximately three miles off the coast of Oahu, near the area of Hawaii Kai. This is a longer boat ride from the Honolulu Harbors and takes a beautiful scenic ride around Diamond Head and the Diamond head light house. Because of the distance from Ala Wai Harbor this site is available on our Private dive charters and a select schedule each month.

  • Depth and Conditions

The Corsair lies in about 107 feet (33 meters) of water, making it a dive suited for those with advanced certifications. The plane is largely intact, resting upright on the sandy ocean floor. Divers will find the cockpit, wings, and tail section in remarkable condition, despite decades underwater. The depth of the wreck means that divers should be prepared for a deep dive and should have experience with deep diving protocols and equipment.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

The waters around Oahu are typically warm and clear, with temperatures ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C) throughout the year. Visibility at the Corsair wreck can extend up to 100 feet (30 meters) on clear days, providing excellent conditions for exploring the details of the aircraft and observing the surrounding marine life.

  • Experience Level Required

Due to its depth, the Corsair wreck is recommended for advanced open water divers. Local dive shops often provide guided dives, which are beneficial for those who may not have extensive experience with deep or wreck diving. For those looking to gain more expertise, PADI Advanced Open Water and Deep Diver Specialty courses are available, offering the necessary training to safely explore deeper sites like the Corsair.

Exploring the Underwater Realm

Diving the Corsair is a unique experience, combining historical significance with the beauty of a thriving underwater ecosystem. The wreck has become an artificial reef, attracting a diverse array of marine life. Soft corals, sponges, and algae have colonized the aircraft, while schools of tropical fish, such as butterflyfish, angelfish, and wrasses, dart around the structure. Larger species, including green sea turtles, eagle rays, and occasionally reef sharks, can also be seen patrolling the area.

As divers descend to the Corsair, they are greeted by the sight of its iconic gull wings and the intact cockpit, providing a tangible connection to its storied past. Exploring the wreck allows divers to appreciate the engineering of the aircraft and the resilience of the marine life that now inhabits it.

Conservation and Future Prospects

The Corsair wreck serves as an important example of how historical artifacts can become valuable components of marine ecosystems. The site not only offers a fascinating dive experience but also highlights the importance of marine conservation. Efforts to protect and preserve these underwater sites are crucial for maintaining their integrity and ensuring they remain accessible to future generations of divers and marine enthusiasts.

Responsible diving practices are essential to preserving the Corsair wreck and its surrounding environment. By adhering to guidelines and supporting conservation initiatives, divers can help protect this unique underwater landmark. The Corsair wreck, with its blend of history and marine biodiversity, offers an unparalleled dive experience off the coast of Oahu, inviting exploration and appreciation of both human and natural heritage.

Reef Dives:

Reef Dive Sites
Turtle Canyon

Turtle Canyon

Turtle Canyon, located approx. 2.5 miles off the coast of Waikiki, Oahu, is a premier snorkeling and diving site known for its abundant sea turtle population and vibrant marine life. Unlike some of Oahu’s other underwater attractions, Turtle Canyon is a natural reef, formed over thousands of years by the accumulation of coral and marine organisms. This site gets its name from the Hawaiian green sea turtles, or "honu," that frequent the area, making it a favorite spot for marine enthusiasts and casual visitors alike.

Turtle Canyon is not just about turtles, though. The reef supports a diverse ecosystem, providing habitats for a variety of fish, invertebrates, and other marine creatures. Its proximity to Waikiki Beach makes it an easily accessible spot for those looking to explore the underwater world of Hawaii.

Snorkeling and Diving at Turtle Canyon

  • Location and Access

Turtle Canyon is conveniently located just off the coast of Waikiki, about a 10 to 15-minute boat ride from Ala Wai Harbor. Swimming from Waikiki to Turtle Canyon, is highly challenging due to strong currents, varying water conditions, and marine traffic. The area around Turtle Canyon is frequented by boats, making swimming to the canyon hazardous and not permitted

  • Depth and Conditions

The depth at Turtle Canyon ranges from 15 to 40 feet (4.5 to 12 meters), making it an ideal site for both snorkeling and shallow dives. The relatively shallow waters allow for plenty of sunlight to reach the reef, enhancing visibility and the overall snorkeling and diving experience. The conditions at Turtle Canyon are generally calm, with gentle currents, making it suitable for beginners and families.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

The waters at Turtle Canyon are typically warm and clear, with temperatures ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C) year-round. Visibility is often excellent, extending up to 100 feet (30 meters) on clear days. This clarity allows snorkelers and divers to fully appreciate the vibrant coral formations and the diverse marine life that inhabits the reef.

  • Experience Level Required

Turtle Canyon is accessible to people of all experience levels. For snorkeling, no prior experience is necessary, and we provide all the necessary equipment and in water guidance by our certified lifeguards. For diving, the shallow depth and generally calm conditions make it a suitable site for those new to diving. Discovery Scuba and Open Water Certified Divers easily explore the reef with guided by our Instructors or Divemasters, ensuring that both novice and experienced divers can enjoy the site safely and comfortably.

Exploring the Underwater Realm

The main attraction at Turtle Canyon is, of course, the Hawaiian green sea turtles. These gentle creatures can often be seen grazing on algae, swimming gracefully through the water, or resting on the reef. They are accustomed to human presence, allowing for close encounters that are both thrilling and educational.

In addition to turtles, Turtle Canyon is home to a variety of other marine life. Colorful fish such as butterflyfish, angelfish, and parrotfish are common sightings, darting among the coral formations. The reef itself is alive with hard and soft corals, sponges, and anemones, creating a vibrant underwater landscape.

Snorkelers and divers might also spot moray eels, octopuses, and even the occasional reef shark. The diversity of marine life makes every visit to Turtle Canyon unique, with new sights and experiences each time.

Conservation and Future Prospects

Turtle Canyon is a valuable natural resource, and its popularity underscores the importance of marine conservation. Efforts to protect the site include educating visitors about responsible snorkeling and diving practices, such as not touching or disturbing the marine life and avoiding contact with the coral to prevent damage.

Local organizations and tour operators often collaborate on conservation initiatives, such as reef cleanups and monitoring programs. These efforts help ensure that Turtle Canyon remains a healthy and vibrant ecosystem for future generations to enjoy.

Visitors to Turtle Canyon are encouraged to practice eco-friendly behaviors, such as using reef-safe sunscreen and minimizing their impact on the environment. By supporting conservation efforts and adhering to guidelines, snorkelers and divers can help preserve the beauty and biodiversity of this remarkable site.

Turtle Canyon offers an unforgettable experience, combining the thrill of encountering sea turtles and other marine life with the serene beauty of a Hawaiian reef. Whether you are a seasoned diver or a first-time snorkeler, Turtle Canyon provides a unique opportunity to connect with the underwater world and appreciate the natural wonders of Oahu.

Ewa Pinnacles

Ewa Pinnacles

Ewa Pinnacles at Ewa Beach/Pearl Harbor on Oahu

 

 

Ewa Pinnacles is an exceptional dive site located off the south shore of Oahu, near Pearl Harbor. Known for its towering underwater formations and diverse marine life, Ewa Pinnacles offers a unique diving experience that attracts both local and visiting divers. This natural underwater structure, formed by ancient lava flows, showcases the geological history of the Hawaiian Islands while providing a rich habitat for a variety of sea creatures.

The pinnacles rise dramatically from the ocean floor, creating an underwater landscape of peaks and valleys. This site has been a favorite among divers for many years due to its impressive topography and the abundance of marine life that thrives around these towering structures. Ewa Pinnacles remains a testament to the dynamic geological forces that shaped the Hawaiian Islands and continues to draw those interested in exploring its underwater beauty.

Scuba Diving at Ewa Pinnacles

  • Location and Access

Ewa Pinnacles is located off the coast of Ewa Beach, near Pearl Harbor on Oahu's south shore at approximately 21.287667° N latitude and -158.002500° W longitude. The dive site is accessible by boat. Because of the distance from Ala Wai Harbor and Waikiki this site is combined with the Navy Tug dive. Ewa Pinnacles is available on our Private dive charters and a select schedule each month.

  • Depth and Conditions

The depth at Ewa Pinnacles ranges from 40 to 70 feet (12 to 21 meters), making it suitable for divers of varying experience levels. The pinnacles rise from the sandy bottom, creating an intricate maze of peaks and crevices to explore. Water conditions at the site are generally favorable, with good visibility and relatively mild currents. However, divers should always be prepared for potential changes in conditions and plan their dives accordingly.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

The waters around Ewa Pinnacles are warm year-round, with temperatures ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C). Visibility is typically excellent, often reaching up to 100 feet (30 meters) on clear days. This clarity allows divers to fully appreciate the dramatic underwater landscape and the vibrant marine life that inhabits the pinnacles.

  • Experience Level Required

Ewa Pinnacles is suitable for divers of all experience levels, from novice to advanced. The moderate depth and favorable conditions make it an ideal site for those new to diving, while the complex topography and rich marine life provide plenty of interest for more experienced divers. Guided dives are available through local dive shops, ensuring a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone. For those looking to enhance their skills, PADI courses such as Open Water and Advanced Open Water are available.

Exploring the Underwater Realm

Diving at Ewa Pinnacles is a captivating experience, offering a unique combination of geological wonder and marine biodiversity. The pinnacles themselves are impressive formations, rising sharply from the ocean floor and creating a labyrinth of peaks, valleys, and swim-throughs. These structures are covered in a variety of corals and sponges, providing a colorful backdrop for the diverse marine life that inhabits the area.

Divers can expect to encounter a wide range of species, from schools of tropical fish like butterflyfish, angelfish, and parrotfish, to larger inhabitants such as green sea turtles, moray eels, and reef sharks. The crevices and overhangs of the pinnacles are also home to an array of invertebrates, including octopuses, nudibranchs, and shrimp. This diversity makes every dive at Ewa Pinnacles a unique and exciting experience.

Conservation and Future Prospects

Ewa Pinnacles is not only a popular dive site but also an important marine habitat. Efforts to preserve and protect this underwater ecosystem are essential for maintaining its health and biodiversity. Local dive operators and conservation groups often collaborate on initiatives such as reef cleanups and marine life monitoring, ensuring that Ewa Pinnacles remains a vibrant and sustainable environment for future generations to enjoy.

Visitors to Ewa Pinnacles are encouraged to practice responsible diving behaviors, such as not touching or disturbing the marine life and avoiding contact with the corals to prevent damage. Using reef-safe sunscreen and minimizing waste are also important steps in protecting this delicate ecosystem. By supporting conservation efforts and adhering to guidelines, divers can help preserve the natural beauty of Ewa Pinnacles.

Ewa Pinnacles offers an unparalleled diving experience off the south shore of Oahu. Its unique geological formations and rich marine life create a captivating underwater landscape that appeals to divers of all skill levels. Whether you are a seasoned diver or new to the sport, exploring Ewa Pinnacles provides a fascinating glimpse into the dynamic and diverse underwater world of Hawaii.

Nautiles Reef

Nautilus Reef

Nautilus Reef at Point Panic on Oahu

 

Nautilus Reef, located off the south shore of Oahu, is a spectacular dive site known for its vibrant coral formations and diverse marine life. This natural reef has been shaped over thousands of years by the growth of corals and the movement of the ocean, creating an underwater haven for a variety of marine species. Named for its intricate, nautilus shell-like formations, Nautilus Reef offers a visually stunning dive experience that attracts divers from around the world.

The reef's history is deeply intertwined with the rich marine environment of Oahu. Over the years, it has evolved into a thriving ecosystem, providing a home for countless fish, invertebrates, and other sea creatures. The reef's proximity to Honolulu makes it an accessible and popular spot for both novice and experienced divers.

Scuba Diving at Nautilus Reef

  • Location and Access

Nautilus Reef is situated off the coast of Waikiki, just a short boat ride from Honolulu. The brief journey from the shore allows divers to spend more time exploring the underwater wonders of Nautilus Reef.  This Reef is also accessible by DPV aka (underwater scooters) from Point Panic as a shore dive. We offer the PADI Diver Propulsion Vehicle Specialty course to get you on your way.

  • Depth and Conditions

The depth at Nautilus Reef ranges from 30 to 60 feet (9 to 18 meters), making it suitable for divers of all skill levels. The reef's varied topography, with its ridges, valleys, and overhangs, provides an interesting and dynamic environment for exploration. The water conditions at Nautilus Reef are typically calm, with good visibility, although divers should always be prepared for occasional currents and changes in conditions.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

The waters around Nautilus Reef are warm and inviting year-round, with temperatures ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C). Visibility at the reef is often excellent, reaching up to 100 feet (30 meters) on clear days. This clarity allows divers to fully appreciate the intricate coral formations and the vibrant marine life that call Nautilus Reef home.

  • Experience Level Required

Nautilus Reef is an ideal dive site for divers of all experience levels. The moderate depth and generally favorable conditions make it accessible to beginners, while the reef's complex structure and abundant marine life offer plenty of interest for advanced divers. Local dive shops provide guided dives, ensuring a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone. For those looking to improve their skills, PADI courses such as Open Water and Advanced Open Water are available.

Exploring the Underwater Realm

Diving at Nautilus Reef is a mesmerizing experience, offering a glimpse into the rich marine biodiversity of Oahu. The reef is covered in a variety of hard and soft corals, sponges, and algae, creating a colorful and dynamic underwater landscape. The intricate formations of the reef resemble the shell of a nautilus, with spirals and curves that provide shelter for a multitude of marine species.

Divers can expect to encounter a wide range of marine life at Nautilus Reef. Schools of tropical fish, including butterflyfish, angelfish, and parrotfish, are common sights, swimming among the coral formations. The reef is also home to larger inhabitants such as green sea turtles, moray eels, and reef sharks. The nooks and crannies of the reef provide hiding places for smaller creatures like octopuses, nudibranchs, and shrimp, adding to the site's diversity and intrigue.

Conservation and Future Prospects

Nautilus Reef is a vital component of Oahu's marine ecosystem, and its preservation is crucial for maintaining the health and biodiversity of the area. Efforts to protect Nautilus Reef include promoting responsible diving practices and supporting local conservation initiatives. These efforts help ensure that the reef remains a vibrant and sustainable environment for future generations to enjoy.

Visitors to Nautilus Reef are encouraged to practice eco-friendly behaviors, such as using reef-safe sunscreen and minimizing their impact on the environment. By following guidelines and supporting conservation efforts, divers can help protect the delicate ecosystem of Nautilus Reef. Participating in reef cleanups and marine life monitoring programs are also ways to contribute to the preservation of this remarkable dive site.

Nautilus Reef offers an unparalleled diving experience off the south shore of Oahu. Its unique coral formations and diverse marine life create a captivating underwater environment that appeals to divers of all skill levels. Whether you are a seasoned diver or new to the sport, exploring Nautilus Reef provides an opportunity to connect with the natural beauty of Hawaii and appreciate the intricate ecosystems that thrive beneath the surface.

Secrets

Secrets

Secrets Dive Site at Point Panic on Oahu

Secrets Dive Site, located off Point Panic near Kaka'ako Waterfront Park, is a hidden treasure among Oahu's dive locations. Unlike more famous wreck sites, Secrets does not have a dramatic human history. Instead, it is renowned for its natural beauty and vibrant marine life. The name "Secrets" reflects its relatively undiscovered status, known mainly to local divers who appreciate its secluded location and rich underwater ecosystem.

Scuba Diving Secrets Dive Site

  • Location and Access

Secrets Dive Site is situated at approximately 21.287833° N latitude and -157.864500° W longitude. The site is easily accessible via a concrete staircase entry near Kaka'ako Waterfront Park. Despite being close to urban Honolulu, the dive site offers a tranquil and immersive underwater experience away from the city's hustle and bustle. Accessing this by DPV aka (underwater scooters) from Point Panic as a shore dive you can also explore Horse Shoe and all the way out to the Pipe. We offer the PADI Diver Propulsion Vehicle Specialty course to get you on your way.

  • Depth and Conditions

The dive site features depths ranging from 30 to 60 feet (9 to 18 meters), making it suitable for divers of all levels. The underwater terrain includes sand patches, coral reefs, and interesting lava formations, providing a diverse and engaging environment for exploration. The moderate depth and relatively calm conditions make it an ideal location for both novice and experienced divers.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

Water temperatures at Secrets Dive Site range from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C) year-round, ensuring comfortable dives. Visibility is often excellent, extending to 100 feet (30 meters) or more on clear days. This clarity enhances the diving experience, allowing divers to fully appreciate the vibrant marine life and intricate coral structures.

  • Experience Level Required

Secrets Dive Site is accessible to divers of all experience levels. The site’s varying depths and calm conditions provide an excellent training ground for new divers, while its complex reef structures offer more experienced divers opportunities for deeper exploration and skill development. 

Exploring the Underwater Realm

Diving at Secrets Dive Site is an immersive experience into a thriving underwater world. The site is home to a diverse array of marine life, including colorful reef fish, octopuses, and occasionally, larger visitors like manta rays and dolphins. The coral formations are a highlight, with vibrant colors and intricate structures that serve as a habitat for numerous marine species.

The lava tubes and swim-throughs add an element of adventure, allowing divers to navigate through natural underwater tunnels and caves. These formations provide unique opportunities for exploration and photography, making Secrets a favorite among underwater photographers and adventure seekers.

Conservation and Future Prospects

Secrets Dive Site exemplifies the balance between human activity and marine conservation. Efforts to preserve the site are crucial, as the health of the coral reefs and the biodiversity they support depend on responsible diving practices. Local dive operators emphasize the importance of marine conservation, educating divers on minimizing their impact on the underwater environment.

Continued efforts to protect Secrets Dive Site are essential for maintaining its beauty and ecological significance. By promoting sustainable diving practices and supporting conservation initiatives, divers can help ensure that Secrets remains a pristine and captivating dive site for future generations.

Horse Shoe Reef

Horse Shoe Reef

Horseshoe Reef: A Diving Treasure at Point Panic on Oahu

Horseshoe Reef, located off the south shore of Oahu, is a prized dive site renowned for its unique underwater topography that forms a natural horseshoe-shaped coral reef. This site is a haven for diverse marine life and offers a spectacular array of underwater landscapes, making it a must-visit location for divers exploring Hawaii.

Scuba Diving Horse Shoe Reef Dive Site

  • Location and Accessibility

Horseshoe Reef is situated approximately 2 miles off the coast of Waikiki, at coordinates 21.2550° N, 157.8230° W. Accessible primarily by boat, the reef can be reached with a short and scenic ride from several local marinas. The site's proximity to Honolulu makes it an attractive option for both tourists and locals. Dive operators in the area offer regular trips to Horseshoe Reef, providing divers with the opportunity to explore this exceptional underwater locale.

  • Depth and Dive Conditions

The reef’s depth varies from 30 to 65 feet (9 to 20 meters), making it suitable for divers of all skill levels, from beginners to advanced enthusiasts. The horseshoe shape of the reef provides a natural protective barrier, which often results in calm water conditions within its perimeter. However, the outer edges of the reef can experience stronger currents, appealing to those looking for a more challenging dive.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

The waters at Horseshoe Reef are typically warm, with temperatures hovering between 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C) year-round. Visibility is generally excellent, ranging from 50 to 100 feet (15 to 30 meters), allowing divers to fully appreciate the vibrant coral growth and the bustling aquatic life that the reef supports.

  • Marine Life and Environmental Features

Horseshoe Reef is a biodiversity hotspot that thrives with a wide array of marine species. The coral formations within the reef are home to an extensive variety of fish, including butterflyfish, parrotfish, and the ever-popular Moorish idols. Larger marine animals such as green sea turtles and reef sharks are also common visitors, adding an element of excitement to every dive.

The reef’s structure includes numerous swim-throughs and overhangs, providing thrilling exploration opportunities. These features are adorned with sponges, sea fans, and other invertebrates, creating a colorful and dynamic underwater landscape.

Highlights and Special Attractions

One of the highlights of diving at Horseshoe Reef is the "Eye of the Reef," a natural tunnel-like formation that divers can swim through. This feature is particularly popular for underwater photography due to its unique shape and the play of light within the tunnel.

Night diving at Horseshoe Reef offers a completely different experience, as nocturnal creatures emerge and the coral seems to come alive under the glow of dive lights. Bioluminescent organisms can also be seen on night dives, adding to the magical atmosphere of the reef after dark.

Conservation and Sustainability

As a cherished ecological site, Horseshoe Reef is subject to conservation efforts aimed at preserving its natural beauty and ecological balance. Divers are encouraged to adhere to responsible diving practices, such as maintaining good buoyancy to avoid contacting the reef, using reef-safe sunscreen, and participating in conservation activities and educational programs offered by local dive operators.

Kewalo Pipe

Kewalo Pipe

Kewalo Pipe: A Diver's Gateway to the Underwater World of Oahu

Kewalo Pipe is a well-known dive site located off the south shore of Oahu, celebrated for its straightforward dive plan and abundant marine life. The site features an underwater pipeline that serves as an artificial reef, attracting a diverse array of aquatic species. It's a favorite among both novice and experienced divers for its accessibility and the unique underwater experiences it offers.

Scuba Diving Kewalo Pipe Dive Site

  • Location and Accessibility

Kewalo Pipe is situated approximately 1 mile off the coast of Kewalo Basin Harbor, near Waikiki. The dive site is positioned at coordinates 21.2849° N, 157.8550° W. Access to the site is by by boat or DPV aka (underwater scooters) from Point Panic as a shore dive. We offer the PADI Diver Propulsion Vehicle Specialty course to get you on your way. Kewalo Pipe is an easy-to-navigate dive site that we frequently visit for our night dives. This location is renowned for its accessibility and straightforward layout, making it a favorite among divers.

  • Depth and Dive Conditions

The Kewalo Pipe, also known as Point Panic Pipe, runs perpendicular to the shoreline. This old storm drain extends from the shoreline out into the ocean, creating a prominent feature that divers can follow. The Kewalo Pipe starts near the Kaka'ako Waterfront Park and stretches out into deeper waters, providing a habitat for various marine species and an interesting structure for divers to explore The pipeline starts at a shallow depth of about 30 feet, extending down to around 60 feet. This range makes it suitable for both beginners and advanced divers. The conditions at the site are generally mild with light currents, although they can vary depending on weather conditions. The seabed around the pipeline is primarily sandy, which helps improve visibility, typically ranging from 50 to 100 feet depending on the time of day and weather.

  • Water Temperature and Visibility

Divers at Kewalo Pipe can enjoy warm water temperatures year-round, ranging from 75°F to 82°F (24°C to 28°C). The visibility is usually very good, making it easy to observe the rich marine life and explore the detailed features of the underwater pipeline and its surroundings.

  • Marine Life and Environmental Features

Kewalo Pipe is particularly noted for its vibrant marine life. The pipeline itself is encrusted with various corals and serves as a habitat for countless invertebrates. Divers can expect to see a plethora of reef fish, including butterflyfish, angelfish, and the Hawaiian state fish, the Humuhumunukunukuapua'a. Larger marine animals such as sea turtles and white tip reef sharks are also common sightings, particularly along the deeper sections of the pipe.

Highlights and Special Attractions

The main attraction of Kewalo Pipe is the pipeline itself, which creates a unique underwater landscape that differs markedly from the surrounding seabed. The structure of the pipe allows divers to follow a direct route while exploring, making navigation straightforward. This feature is particularly appealing to less experienced divers or those new to navigating underwater environments.

Additionally, the area around the pipe is known for occasional visits by larger pelagic fish, providing a thrilling experience for divers when species like manta rays and dolphins pass by. Night diving at Kewalo Pipe offers a completely different perspective, as nocturnal creatures come out and the pipeline becomes a focal point for feeding activities.

Conservation and Sustainable Practices

Preservation of the marine environment at Kewalo Pipe is crucial due to its ecological importance and popularity among divers. Divers are encouraged to practice responsible behaviors, such as not touching or disturbing the marine life and maintaining proper buoyancy to avoid damaging the corals. Dive operators in the area are active in promoting environmental awareness and participate in marine conservation initiatives, including regular clean-up dives to ensure the site remains pristine and healthy.

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